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It would be nice if they did a core charge and you could send back the A arms you removed.
I guess it's a matter of how much time you save pressing out the old bearings and pressing in the new bearings, or how much a shop charges.
It's not hard to do yourself if you have a press and the proper plates, but nothing is easier than unbolting and re-bolting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #42 ·
@RYUK Just the uniball upgrade alone should go to shop to give it the new alignment specs suggested as part of the upgrade (if I read that correctly).
 

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To simplify installation, has anyone in the US gotten these from Alfa9 Supply?
This is what I was quoting for price
View attachment 116911
You need to check that uniballs are fitted in both positions. I know that, at least initially, Jamie only fitted one uniball in each of these arms.
 

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@RYUK Just the uniball upgrade alone should go to shop to give it the new alignment specs suggested as part of the upgrade (if I read that correctly).
Where are you thinking of having this done?
 

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Drive on down and we could easily knock this out at Garage de Ryuk. Phil would just need an alignment.
Just need a press which is probably available at the Harbor Freight.
 

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Drive on down and we could easily knock this out at Garage de Ryuk. Phil would just need an alignment.
Just need a press which is probably available at the Harbor Freight.
Just remember there can be complications due to larger than expected variations in the bush mounting sleeves on the arms.
 

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To simplify installation, has anyone in the US gotten these from Alfa9 Supply?
This is what I was quoting for price
View attachment 116911
The complete new arms plus Uniballs already installed from GMS is the route I went. I could have had them pressed into my existing arms but wanted to keep my stock spare arms and bushings so IF I ever sell the car I could ensure it can be restored easily to stock for a fussy buyer. The difference between the GMS (that I have) vs. Jamies is that Jamies replaced only the two larger balls and says the smaller ones aren't necessary to replace. I figure since I am doing the work I might as well change out the all of them.
Does it work.....YES. What is happening on a fast sweeper and with stickier tires is that as the suspension loads up the rubber distorts which changes the camber, as it unloads it goes in the opposite direction for camber. Think of this as going form plus to minus to plus to minus camber over and over which gives the feeling you don't know what the rear end is going to do. On slower sharper corners you don't feel it as much but on smooth fast sweepers you do....and as you get more aggressive stickier tires it becomes more obvious. I don't think I could say it will lower a lap time but if you have more confidence in what the car is doing that certainly makes you feel you have more control of the car and should lower your lap time.
This was a similar issue on my old 1969 ALFA spider. While it is a live axle, the rear end was located by a T device which was supposed to hold it from moving side to side. On the stock 165 width tires it was OK but when I ran much stickier tires (Goodyear race slicks) for track use, the rear end moved about 1" to the side under hard cornering because of a rubber bushings....to the point the tire would rub. Rather than a harder bushing, the trick was to install either a Panhard rod setup or ALFAs race sliding block assembly both of which held the axle strongly in place. Like on the 4C that made a big difference on both that spider and my 67 GTV SCCA race car. In the case of those cars the camber wasn't changing (solid rear axle)....but it was doing a bit of rear wheel steering which besides rubbing robbed one of confidence on fast high speed sweepers..
 

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I'm so glad I read this thread. I've scanned over some of the other threads about the uni-balls and thought "ahh, they're over reacting. My car is good on track. I don't need to upgrade that unless I'm trying to do something competitive". I only do a couple of track days a year so I never put 2 & 2 together to figure out that instability is why I don't have confidence in a couple of the long sweeping turns at the tracks I run at (Road America and BIR). I was just telling someone last night that I could probably take the carousel at Road America 10 mph faster and based on what they were saying I am probably giving up 20+ mph in turn 1 at Brainerd. but I just don't feel comfortable. I assumed the problem had to do my my balls as I got older. I'm very happy to finally figure out it can at least be partially fixed with uni balls. As with most things in life, I just wish I'd learned this sooner. I'd really like to have them installed for my track event this weekend.

Once again this forum is finding ways to spend my money. Now, if you'll excuse me, I need to see about buying some aluminum HVAC controls...
 

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For those who don't like the DIY gamble, rusty and flexy OEM control arms and want to save some installation time and costs I suggest a plug and play solution: ALFA ROMEO - 4C - Performance rear arms | GMS

ezgif-4-5049a1ba0584.jpg

P.S.: This car has 14.000 km and I couldn't believe the amount of rust on OEM rear control arms. Owner claims it was never driven in winter, but I believe it was driven on salted roads and then put in to hibernation. The worst you can do to your car. Never hibernate your car once the roads get salted unless you thoroughly clean the underbody.

IMG_20210417_112041_resized_20210428_074021210.jpg

P.S.: Don't forget the alignment after any steering component change. We recently changed coilovers on client's car and alignment (toe) was a mess even though it was a perfectly setup before.
 

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For those who don't like the DIY gamble, rusty and flexy OEM control arms and want to save some installation time and costs I suggest a plug and play solution: ALFA ROMEO - 4C - Performance rear arms | GMS

View attachment 116934

P.S.: This car has 14.000 km and I couldn't believe the amount of rust on OEM rear control arms. Owner claims it was never driven in winter, but I believe it was driven on salted roads and then put in to hibernation. The worst you can do to your car. Never hibernate your car once the roads get salted unless you thoroughly clean the underbody.

View attachment 116933

P.S.: Don't forget the alignment after any steering component change. We recently changed coilovers on client's car and alignment (toe) was a mess even though it was a perfectly setup before.
I have a quickjack, is it possible to lift the car and clean all the prone areas underneath without taking off any trays etc? What do you clean with, just rags and a soap solution?
 

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I tend not to drive car once the roads get salted after the season and not start to drive before first heavy rain in the beginning of the season.

If you do drive in the meantime, I strongly suggest to drive on a heavy rainy day before hibernating your car. Or clean it thoroughly with WAP (high pressure water cleaner), go for a drive to get the underbody dry and store it. You can use some WD40 or similair on critical areas. I also tend to spray all the bolts, nuts and components that have any sign of rust any time I'm working on a car. Mine or client's.
 

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I tend not to drive car once the roads get salted after the season and not start to drive before first heavy rain in the beginning of the season.

If you do drive in the meantime, I strongly suggest to drive on a heavy rainy day before hibernating your car. Or clean it thoroughly with WAP (high pressure water cleaner), go for a drive to get the underbody dry and store it. You can use some WD40 or similair on critical areas. I also tend to spray all the bolts, nuts and components that have any sign of rust any time I'm working on a car. Mine or client's.
We are having a real drought season in England, no rain for ages to wash the roads and so it's difficult keeping the car hibernating well into April and May, you read about how bad it is for the car to be hibernating for 5-6 months so it's a real toss up between driving out or not, I have been out a few times recently to get the car going again and the roads are bone dry. Hoping I am doing the best to compromise, damned if we drive damned if we don't!! And our mental health is hit when you keep going in your garage to dream about getting the 4C out !
 
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