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I am curious how many of these cars will be Alfa Romeo and how many will actually be a car from one of Stellantis other companies then rebadged as Alfa Romeo.. It also wasn't clear how many, if any, we will see in the United States..
 

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And knowing the Italians, the small updates of the Giulia and Stelvio are definitely calculated in that sum.
Still, maybe our prayers will be heard...
There are hardly any Italians left at Alfa, they filled all the top spots with french men, so maybe that will change.
 

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I am curious how many of these cars will be Alfa Romeo and how many will actually be a car from one of Stellantis other companies then rebadged as Alfa Romeo.. It also wasn't clear how many, if any, we will see in the United States..
How cynical! 😉 We all know (good guess) all of them will be:cry:…unless they rebadge the MC20 using that beautiful little V6 before the ‘all electrification’ date.
The Tonale is definitely coming to the US.
 

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Wonder what they define as “launch”?
Tomale has been 2-3 years in coming, and isn’t likely to debut until MY 2023.
So if they want a subsequent model, it should debut within the next 6 months.
But Stellantis isn’t going to Geneva from what I’ve read. So where would they release it? That’s been the traditional Alfa venue.

Also, that really means only 3 models beyond Tonale. Half Sergio’s plan, and twice what was realized.
 

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I posted this over on the Giulia forums…


When they announced they were scrapping plans to reintroduce Peugeot to N.America and they would instead focus on Alfa, I rejoiced.
When they announced 10bn Euro investment in each brand to "prove themselves", i rejoiced.
Then it came out that they would be "sharing" platforms with PSA, and the new high-level appointees at Alfa are from PSA. No more rejoicing.

My first instinct is to rejoice at this new news. But i know there will be a "catch", a "caveat", a "compromise" that will disappoint.

That being said. i'll reserve my judgement until they announce the new models (and how much they have in common with Peugeots on sale in Europe).

Does anyone think any of the new models will use the Giorgio platform? if not, which platform(s) would they use?
 

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There are hardly any Italians left at Alfa, they filled all the top spots with french men, so maybe that will change.
There goes the neighbourhood, so to speak. 😉 😁 Traditions out the door. Will someone tell ‘em there should be more than only a tarted up 4-dr at the top of the Alfa range, even if it has only two seats. The appearance of new product continues to be glacial. The Tonale and Brennero (or whatever it’ll be called) may be the bread and butter the marque ‘needs’ to survive but please, it doesn’t need to be at the exclusion of an aspirational halo model.
 

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They're not even making a quad tonale, what good can come from new models. Half of them will be high volume "affordable" options. You'd be surprised at how many people at least in Italy are convinced that Alfa's bread and butter should be front wheel drive hatchbacks
 

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"Starting form 2027, all Alfa Romeo new vehicles would be electric"
How cynical! 😉 We all know (good guess) all of them will be:cry:…unless they rebadge the MC20 using that beautiful little V6 before the ‘all electrification’ date.
The Tonale is definitely coming to the US.
Dealer told me he expects a new Alfa Romeo halo car to be coming, but that it will immediately be an variation to the electric MC20.
 

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I posted this over on the Giulia forums…


When they announced they were scrapping plans to reintroduce Peugeot to N.America and they would instead focus on Alfa, I rejoiced.
When they announced 10bn Euro investment in each brand to "prove themselves", i rejoiced.
Then it came out that they would be "sharing" platforms with PSA, and the new high-level appointees at Alfa are from PSA. No more rejoicing.

My first instinct is to rejoice at this new news. But i know there will be a "catch", a "caveat", a "compromise" that will disappoint.

That being said. i'll reserve my judgement until they announce the new models (and how much they have in common with Peugeots on sale in Europe).

Does anyone think any of the new models will use the Giorgio platform? if not, which platform(s) would they use?
Sharing a platform doesn't have to be that bad, as long as its capable of RWD. Most comes out of the stuff you bold onto it. That's why everybody praises Ms, AMGs, GT3/4s, ...

Giorgio was a wonderful platform, that Audi was eagerin to get its hand on. But it's 10 years old in the meantime. Maybe a bigger Alfa could get it, but then again it would make more sense using the Citroen DS9 base... :-(.

Have a look at how Lotus (or better said Geely) is using 1 platform to share a variety of cars, from sports to SUV:
 

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They're not even making a quad tonale, what good can come from new models. Half of them will be high volume "affordable" options. You'd be surprised at how many people at least in Italy are convinced that Alfa's bread and butter should be front wheel drive hatchbacks
Well, what's for sure is that Alfa had 200.000 loyal buyers. Marchionne wanted to up that to 400k, but made the cars too expensive for the common Alfa driver. Go on a all models Alfa Romeo forum and you'll find out. But these 'bread and butter' buyers love the driving dynamics, so that's where Alfa has to keep its focus.
 

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Shared platforms across brands are all well and good for the suits at head office, but the vehicles need to offer meaningful differences the consumer or the effort of rebranding similar vehicles is wasted. Jeep Renegade outsold Fiat 500X ten to one, even though they were very similar under the skin and sold often from opposite ends of the same showroom.
 

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I'm not really sure what the rejoicing and/or gnashing of teeth is really all about with you folk. As a long time (44 years and counting) Alfa owner and multiple type and vintage (1951 Matta to 2019 Stelvio, with 750 and 101 Series Spiders and Alfettas thrown in) I don't see what difference it makes who runs the company or what platform they use. If you like the new Alfas great! If you don't, go buy something else and SHUT UP!

My wife's "new" 2019 Stelvio Ti has about as much "Alfaness" (whatever the hell that is) in common with our our 1957 750 Series Giulietta Spider as a Pier Cub has with a 747 but they are both Alfas and - I hate to admit it - I like the 2 ton beast. Only thing I can find alike other than the logo (which is different but the same) is that they are both red 4 cylinder Alfas. I've never really been drawn to the new Giulia but I loved my Alfetta sedan.

I once had a chance to drive an 8C Competezione and politely declined saying that if I were interested in a new Maserati I'd go buy one. Yes the car is drop dead gorgeous but underneath the good looks is nothing more than a Maserati Coupe with an F136 engine and associated driveline. Hardly the stuff of Alfa legend, or is it?. Same thing with the TZ-3. A Dodge Viper in an Italian suit. Really gang, are these "real" Alfa Romeos? If to you they are, then ACCEPT whatever Alfa turns out and DON'T complain, buy them. Buy lots of them so Alfa survives.

If you want to respond and get me into a real Alfa discussion then I expect you to describe what your proper definition of an Alfa is/should be and why what the French guys are doing is wrong... Otherwise, write what you will and I'll be happy to ignore you and your comments and let the new Alfas speak for themselves.

The first factory building of A.L.F.A. was in the first place property of Società Anonima Italiana Darracq (SAID), founded in 1906 by the French automobile firm of Alexandre Darracq, with some Italian investors.
In the mid-1950s, Alfa Romeo entered into an agreement with Brazil's Matarazzo Group to create a company called Fabral (Fábrica Brasileira de Automóveis Alfa, "the Brazilian Alfa automobile factory") to build the Alfa Romeo 2000 there.

Also, don't forget, Alfa built trucks, buses, airplane engine (some their own, others under license) LCVs and trolleys just to mention a few.
 

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@MultiAlfaOwner Spot on comments. I always lusted for the Graduate as a young man, but when I drove one two years ago I was disappointed. On the other hand, the reliability and wonderful driving feel of my wife's Stelvio made my decision to get a 4C easy. My flawless experience with the Stelvio to date greatly allayed any reliability concerns I had.

Plus, French cars are idiosyncratic and I love that.
 

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I'm not really sure what the rejoicing and/or gnashing of teeth is really all about with you folk. As a long time (44 years and counting) Alfa owner and multiple type and vintage (1951 Matta to 2019 Stelvio, with 750 and 101 Series Spiders and Alfettas thrown in) I don't see what difference it makes who runs the company or what platform they use. If you like the new Alfas great! If you don't, go buy something else and SHUT UP!

My wife's "new" 2019 Stelvio Ti has about as much "Alfaness" (whatever the hell that is) in common with our our 1957 750 Series Giulietta Spider as a Pier Cub has with a 747 but they are both Alfas and - I hate to admit it - I like the 2 ton beast. Only thing I can find alike other than the logo (which is different but the same) is that they are both red 4 cylinder Alfas. I've never really been drawn to the new Giulia but I loved my Alfetta sedan.

I once had a chance to drive an 8C Competezione and politely declined saying that if I were interested in a new Maserati I'd go buy one. Yes the car is drop dead gorgeous but underneath the good looks is nothing more than a Maserati Coupe with an F136 engine and associated driveline. Hardly the stuff of Alfa legend, or is it?. Same thing with the TZ-3. A Dodge Viper in an Italian suit. Really gang, are these "real" Alfa Romeos? If to you they are, then ACCEPT whatever Alfa turns out and DON'T complain, buy them. Buy lots of them so Alfa survives.

If you want to respond and get me into a real Alfa discussion then I expect you to describe what your proper definition of an Alfa is/should be and why what the French guys are doing is wrong... Otherwise, write what you will and I'll be happy to ignore you and your comments and let the new Alfas speak for themselves.

The first factory building of A.L.F.A. was in the first place property of Società Anonima Italiana Darracq (SAID), founded in 1906 by the French automobile firm of Alexandre Darracq, with some Italian investors.
In the mid-1950s, Alfa Romeo entered into an agreement with Brazil's Matarazzo Group to create a company called Fabral (Fábrica Brasileira de Automóveis Alfa, "the Brazilian Alfa automobile factory") to build the Alfa Romeo 2000 there.

Also, don't forget, Alfa built trucks, buses, airplane engine (some their own, others under license) LCVs and trolleys just to mention a few.

A bit harsh.
Don't confuse a specialty car like the TZ or a limited run (1,000 cars worldwide in all forms) 8C with bread and butter production cars.
Nor can you compare vehicles that are over 60 years apart - markets, consumer tastes, regulations all change and drive what a company can/will sell.
And past performance does not guarantee future results (I read that somewhere :)) . What happened over a century ago, has no bearing on what we can expect the brand to become now.
Certainly, auto makers need to adapt. But certain brands have a chachet that has meaning to its clientele.
You won't see Bentley (owned by VAG) putting out a model based on the Golf, although you will see a fair bit of hardware shared all up and down the VAG lineup.
Selling an Alfa that is really just a re-badged Peugeot with a few different colour and wheel options would be a death knell to the brand.
Using common underpinnings, while offering different vehicles and driving dynamics, on the other hand, would make business sense to both the guys in suits, and the ones in bean-bag chairs.
Even moreso when it comes to absorbing the huge investment required to make the shift to EV's.

Change is not necessarily a bad thing. Change for change's sake, usually is. But the industry is going through several upheavals, and this one is required.
Hopefully, it permits the brand to not only continue, but to thrive and maintain some of its unique traits which endear it to its enthusiast owners so much.
 
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