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I recently purchased a 2015 4C with 12K miles on December 1st. My wife and I fell in love with the car. I installed the Alfaworks Stage 1 ECU shortly after purchase and the car is perfect. I traded in my 2016 Camaro 2SS and have no regrets. With the clone ECU the car has the perfect amount of power. I definitely think about modding further, but at this time I just want to focus on maintaining it. We also have a 2016 Charger Hellcat which satisfies the power need.

Anyways, I did not do much due diligence before making the purchase, but once we got home I started digging into the recommended maintenance schedule. I have no proof the cam belt or bolt fastening procedure had been performed so I began planning how to get it done.The 5 year mark is in March, so this weekend I will be performing the work. I'm shooting to complete it in the weekend, but am prepared to be down a little while longer. I found some good information on this forum so I thought I would be helpful to others and document my experience performing the service.

I spent the last two weeks gathering all necessary parts, fluids, and tools. The comprehensive list is below,

TechAuthority USB card, 81-270-15020-SUSB
SKF Water Pump with seal, 60586222 - Alfa Workshop
Alfa Cambelt kit. 71775896 - Alfa Workshop (idler pulley, tensioner, belt)
Cam and crank lock kit, 1750TBLOCK 6899 - Alfa Workshop
Vacuum pump gasket, MOPAR 68315243AA
Cam cover seal, MOPAR 68122847AA (not sure I needed this, better safe than sorry)
2 gallons of Mopar 10 year/150,000 50/50 coolant, MOPAR 68163849AB
Serpentine Belt, MOPAR 68237775AA
Air Filter, MOPAR 68251477AA
Quinn 3/8 Digital Torque Wrench (Yes, Harbor Freight)
Metric Crowfoot set
C-channel mod to standard jack stands, jack pucks.

The service manual is very good, so I think it should go smoothly. When installing the cam timing tools it does not mention turning the crank to achieve the proper line-up of the cams and crank, but I would assume this will be necessary to install the locking tools. When I get the vacuum pump and cam seal off I'm sure it will be obvious. My one regret so far is that I did not just source everything from Alfaworks (vacuum pump gasket had to be ordered at the dealer, $19.00, cam cover seal was $23.76). Shipments from Alfaworks have been problem free.

For the body panels I am planning to pull the hood and the rear passenger quarter panel. If I don't have access to everything after removing the under body shields I'll evaluate if pulling the other quarter panel and front fenders makes sense. I watched a video on removing the hood without pulling up the seal, so I'm going to give that a shot.

Wish me luck, and I'll be sure to share any tips or pitfalls as I get through the work.
 

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Thanks for the part numbers for the cam belt change. Conventional wisdom is to replace the water pump and accessory belt while you are in there. I’ll be following along wit your findings with interest as I intend to do mine in a couple weeks.

For the bolt tightening, be sure to read through the couple threads on here documenting it. It all goes very smoothly. No need to remove the fenders for the bolts, and there are some good tips about access to some of the trickier ones in those threads.

Congrats on the new 4C, and best of luck with the servicing!
 

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I’ve done bolt tightening before and hood removal twice. It’s fairly easy and you are correct, there’s no reason to get a new seal. I’ve been easily able to move it in and out and never had leaks. I plan to tackle the timing belt too soon. Gonna follow you as well. Good luck 👍
 

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it Can be done in a weekend. It took me 19 hours to do mine. I recommend pulling both rear quarters to make life easy. I’m not the tallest guy in the world.
 

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it Can be done in a weekend. It took me 19 hours to do mine. I recommend pulling both rear quarters to make life easy. I’m not the tallest guy in the world.
Did you resolve or find any more info about the reported potential issue with the tension setting technique? If I remember correctly, there was a theory that the issue someone else encountered may also have contributed to your first tensioner pulley failing.
 

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Why both quarters? Isn't everything accessed from the passenger side?
For me as I went in the second time I to replace a failed tensioner. I decided to do it and I then didn’t need a stool to reach over the car to gain access to the back of the cams for the cam tooling.

I’m 5’9 and with the car on a quick jack it puts the car pretty high.
 

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Did you resolve or find any more info about the reported potential issue with the tension setting technique? If I remember correctly, there was a theory that the issue someone else encountered may also have contributed to your first tensioner pulley failing.
I did. So after I started getting a cam correlation error check engine light. And tore back into the car. I was able to still set the cam lock tools accordingly so I knew I didn’t skip timing. I set the (failed)moving tensioner back to the proper setting and in proving the failure I rotated the engine about 10-15 some odd times and it would just steadily drop out of tension while doing so.
After waiting a week I got my new tensioner from mopar parts online and I have not had any issues since. I have about 3k miles on everything currently.
So what was the other theory of issue?
 

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That makes sense, I never thought about the car being up in the air. I'm only 5'7" so it would be even harder for me.

For me as I went in the second time I to replace a failed tensioner. I decided to do it and I then didn’t need a stool to reach over the car to gain access to the back of the cams for the cam tooling.

I’m 5’9 and with the car on a quick jack it puts the car pretty high.
 

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So what was the other theory of issue?
In your thread, @sigsegv posted this:

From what I have heard from the dealership (should be taken with a grain of salt, considering their history of communications with me), is that there is a tension pointer below a slider slot in the pulley that has to be at a correct position once the engine is at normal operating temperature. If it is in this position when cold, it ends up overtensioning the belt. In this case, it also resulted in a tensioner pulley bearing failure, resulting in grease coming out of the bearing seal. They claim the service manual is ambiguous and does not adequately describe this requirement.
Do you (or anyone else on here) know anything more about this? Is this an issue, or is following the service manual adequate?
 

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In your thread, @sigsegv posted this:



Do you (or anyone else on here) know anything more about this? Is this an issue, or is following the service manual adequate?
For me that’s not a issue on the proper setting of the tensioner. The service manual I thought was very straight forward on the process of setting the tensioner in my opinion. But I could see maybe people get scared and want it set as tight as possible in fear of it giving or they think they have slack in the belt so they set it as tight as they can.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
I finished the timing belt today. I will post a detailed write up with some photos this weekend. I had to go through the tensioning process several times because one of the cam locks was not threading easily after setting tension. The culprit may have been that I would rotate the crank counterclockwise a very small amount if I passed up my crank mark. I read somewhere on another vehicle that this could cause tensioning to not be correct. I'm not sure if that is what it was, but eventually all timing tools were fitting well enough for me to be satisfied and put it all back together. I'll go into more details with some photos this weekend.
 
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