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Thanks for taking this on and taking the time to post about it! Mine is coming up and I will definitely be referring to your DIY when I do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
Alright, I wanted to get this out while it was still somewhat fresh. I may have some errors, so please read carefully and ask any questions if something looks odd. For doing this job I highly recommend buying the service manual. The manual does leave some details out, but I tried to include them below. This was my first timing belt job, so some of my learning’s may be obvious to those who have done one before. I did this to help others, but please do not trust my write up 100%, please get the manual and check it against what I've provided here. Also, if you haven't worked on cars a moderate amount, this may be too difficult a job for you. I do not want to scare anyone away, but I really do not want someone to get into trouble and end up screwing up their car.

Also, I bought a cheap Husky 3/8 electric ratchet and it really helped speed up the process. I prefer this to an air ratchet. Use good sense when using something like this. Stay away from using it on small bolts that thread into aluminum on the engine (cam locks), it’s too easy to mess up threads.

To store bolts, nuts, and screws during the process I bought a storage bin from. This was really helpful when putting it all back together. Keep hardware related to a particular part all together, or in adjacent bins.

The steps,

1) Drive the front wheels onto two pieces of 2x4.

2) Loosen the right rear wheel lug nuts. (Loosen any other wheels to be removed as well)

3) Jack the car up on either passenger/drive side using the center jack point and position jack stands. Keep the angle relatively mild so the car is stable.

4) Jack the other side of the vehicle and place jack stands. For additional clearance, repeat the process on both sides. Go slow, and watch for any unwanted movement.

5) Remove the right rear tire.

6) Remove the right rear splash shield, two pieces.

7) Remove the right rear quarter panel. You can see most nuts and bolts from the wheel well. There is a bolt up high near the firewall that you have to reach over the engine to get. You need to remove plastic trim at the right side of the trunk lip to access some fasteners. Also, you need to peel back the seal at the upper left corner of the passenger door to access one bolt. The manual is very helpful in identifying all fasteners. There is a hose connected to panel near the gas fill nozzle that has to be disconnected. This one surprised me when pulling off the quarter panel.

8) Remove the plastic intake housing to gain more access.
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9) Remove the rear diffuser.

10) Remove the rear belly pan.

  • The manual has removing the alternator, belt tensioner, idler pulley and vibration damper before removing the engine mount, but you can have more access if your remove the right engine mount first. I followed the manual, but when putting it back together thought this made more sense.
11) Remove the right engine mount. Before doing so, slide shims between the oil pan and lower cross member to support the motor. You can use a jack in addition to make sure it stays steady.

12) Remove the accessory belt by rotating the tensioner counter clockwise.

13) Remove the alternator cover and alternator.

14) Remove the belt tensioner.

15) Remove the idler pulley. There is no access to this with a standard Torx socket. I was able to use an adjustable wrench on the Torx socket to break it loose.

16) Remove the vibration damper. You need access to the flywheel in order to lock it in place. Near the starter is a cover that has two nuts, and the cover can be removed for access to the flywheel teeth. Install the flywheel lock tool, then loosen the damper bolts. I was concerned my damper was stuck and I would need a pulley removal tool, but I was able to break it loose.

17) Remove the flywheel lock.

18) Remove the top engine cover. (You can do this much earlier in the process)

19) Remove the black plastic timing cover.

20) Remove the right engine mounting bracket.

21) Loosen the vacuum reservoir on the right side of the engine and place up out of the way.

22) Remove the vacuum pump on the driver side for access to the exhaust cam.
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23) Remove the intake cam cover for access to the intake cam. You will need to disconnect a small coolant line for better access to one of the bolts. It has a crimp style hose clamp, I was able to use needle nose pliers to disconnect and re-clamp. The re-clamping was no fun. Next time I will buy a small diameter worm clamp.

24) Rotate the engine clockwise until the crank lock tool lines up to be installed. There is a dowel on the crank that lines up with a hole in the crank tool. Once aligned, use a paint marker to make a reference mark. I marked the crank with a pink mark that lined up with a slot in the engine.
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25) Install the cam lock tools on the intake and exhaust cams. You can use the bolts on the intake side, but using vacuum pump bolts are excessively long. I ended up buying 4 M6x1.0x16mm bolts to make install of the exhaust side cam lock easier. I highly recommend this. The vacuum pump bolts are too long for the bottom of the cam lock.
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26) When installing the cam locks, it is possible the bolts will not thread by hand. Do not force them. I loosened the crank lock a bit and moved the crank slightly, with the lock installed, to get to a point where I could thread the cam lock bolts by hand. Another option is to leave the crank lock tight, loosen the tensioner on the timing belt, and put some tension on the cam gear side (pushing clockwise for me), while trying to thread remaining cam lock bolts. In other words, you may easily be able to install 1 or 2 cam lock bolts, but the others may not line up perfectly. Without rotating the cam ever so slightly, you will not be able to install the remaining bolts. You want these bolts to go in smoothly to not risk screwing up the threads. The exhaust cam was the problem one for me.

27) With the crank lock and two cam locks installed, remove the two cam pulley threaded seals located in the center of the pulley for access to the Torx bolts. I did not have the large diameter socket and was able to carefully use an adjustable wrench to remove these. Oil will come out.

28) Loosen the cam pulley Torx bolts, these took some muscle.

29) Remove the moving tensioner, remover the idler pulley, remove the crank lock tool, remove the timing belt. Do not move the crank with the timing belt removed.

30)Remove the intake cam pulley for access to the water pump.

31)Remove the water pump and install new water pump.
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32) Re-Install the intake cam pulley, leave it loose.

33) Install the new idler pulley.

34) Install the new tensioner, leave it loose.

35) Slide in the new timing belt, when installing the timing belt the cam pulleys stay loose.

36) Install the crank timing lock.

37) Thread an engine bracket bolt into the bolt hole below the tensioner. Use one that does not have continuous thread. This will be used for leverage during tensioning of the cam belt.

38) Push on the metal tab with a screwdriver until the pointer moves to its maximum position. This takes some strength, the pointer will move.
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39) Once at maximum, hold it and tighten the tensioner bolt.

40) Tighten the cam pulleys.

41) The belt is now installed with all timing tools in place at max tension.

42) Remove the cam and crank timing tools.

43) Rotate the crankshaft 2 revolutions in the clockwise direction. Use your timing mark to land at exactly 2 revolutions. If you pass it up, you should be able to rotate clockwise 2 more revolutions. Do not rotate counter clockwise ever, I think this may screw up the tension process.

44) Using the screw driver for leverage, loosen the tensioner pulley. The pointer will begin to fall. Once the pointer is pointing at the hole in the pulley bracket, tighten the tensioner.

45) Fit all timing tools. They should all go on smoothly. I had to repeat this numerous times and I think it was because I would bump the crank counter clockwise if I passed the timing mark. If they do not fit smoothly, you need to start over. Thread in one or two of the bolts, then rotate the cam slightly from the pulley side until the bolts thread smoothly. With all timing tools installed, loosen the cam pulleys, then loosen the tensioner. Repeat steps 37-44 until timing tools all install smoothly.

46) Put it all back together!

I'll be happy to answer any questions. I have some more photos also, so if there is something you want to see I may have taken a picture of it.
 

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Nice job and great write up! I'm going to need to do the same soon as well and will certainly use this. Did the intake cam pulley (to get access to the water pump) just pull off by hand? Also, I take it there aren't any timing marks. Imagine the tools can only be installed one way, but, seems like it would save some trouble instead of having to slightly rotate things to get the tool bolts in without binding if there were some crank / cam marks. Didn't see reference to them in the manual, but, thought maybe it was an oversight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Nice job and great write up! I'm going to need to do the same soon as well and will certainly use this. Did the intake cam pulley (to get access to the water pump) just pull off by hand? Also, I take it there aren't any timing marks. Imagine the tools can only be installed one way, but, seems like it would save some trouble instead of having to slightly rotate things to get the tool bolts in without binding if there were some crank / cam marks. Didn't see reference to them in the manual, but, thought maybe it was an oversight.
The intake cam pulley pulled off easily by hand with the bolt removed. You are correct that there are no timing marks. There is a mark on the crank and a slot in the engine casing that I initially thought could be timing marks, but they are not. Once the cam timing tools are installed and the crank timing tool installed, I made the pink mark shown in the photo for ease in lining everything back up. I think the binding I experienced when threading the exhaust side on the initial install is probably normal, I was just extra cautious when bolts did not thread by hand. Simply by loosening the crank timing tool, while still attached, and nudging it in the direction I needed did the trick. A nudge on the cam from the opposing side worked as well when I went through the re-tensioning process, since I was not satisfied with how the cam timing tools were installing after the initial tensioning. As mentioned above, I think this could be a result of me bumping the crank counterclockwise if I passed up my timing mark after rotating the crank 2 revolutions. There are manufacturing tolerances to take into account as well, so I think my experiences are normal.
 

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cswelch, can you go into some more detail on what parts you needed and which ones you didnt? I'm about to purchase the parts needed and so far i just have the water pump/seal(#60586222) , the cam belt (part #71775896 , the auxiliary belt (part # on alfaworkshop 55245963) , and the cam lock tool. I saw you had purchased several other items and wasnt sure if you needed those or if those were replaced as a preventive routine. Thanks!
 

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I am going to have my timing belt changed by my dealer. The following is the list of parts & the part numbers to be replaced. They differ from what you show. I got this info from my dealer, just yesterday.
Timing Belt 68270265AA.
Tensioner 68122839AA.
Water Pump 6825937AA.
Water Pump Seal 6809648AA.
Serpentine Belt 68237775AA.
This is directly from the dealers write up.
 

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cswelch, can you go into some more detail on what parts you needed and which ones you didnt? I'm about to purchase the parts needed and so far i just have the water pump/seal(#60586222) , the cam belt (part #71775896 , the auxiliary belt (part # on alfaworkshop 55245963) , and the cam lock tool. I saw you had purchased several other items and wasnt sure if you needed those or if those were replaced as a preventive routine. Thanks!
Forgot the prices; Timing Belt $75.85, Tensioner $116.00, Water Pump $200.00, Water Pump Seal $5.95, Serpentine Belt $42.20. Again, this is directly from the Dealer write up.
 

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Forgot the prices; Timing Belt $75.85, Tensioner $116.00, Water Pump $200.00, Water Pump Seal $5.95, Serpentine Belt $42.20. Again, this is directly from the Dealer write up.
Yeah i think the part numbers will differ because the part numbers i'm listing are from the alfaworkshop website in GB. Or will they be the same part numbers?!? Idk lol
 

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Yeah i think the part numbers will differ because the part numbers i'm listing are from the alfaworkshop website in GB. Or will they be the same part numbers?!? Idk lol
For whatever reason, the same part in Europe has a different part number in the US.
 

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Discussion Starter · #33 ·
cswelch, can you go into some more detail on what parts you needed and which ones you didnt? I'm about to purchase the parts needed and so far i just have the water pump/seal(#60586222) , the cam belt (part #71775896 , the auxiliary belt (part # on alfaworkshop 55245963) , and the cam lock tool. I saw you had purchased several other items and wasnt sure if you needed those or if those were replaced as a preventive routine. Thanks!
See my comments in bold.

My list
TechAuthority USB card, 81-270-15020-SUSB - Can get away with the free stuff online, but with the links not working, I did not want to fight through it all and just bought the usb card.
SKF Water Pump with seal, 60586222 - Alfa Workshop - Needed.
Alfa Cambelt kit. 71775896 - Alfa Workshop (idler pulley, tensioner, belt) - Needed.
Cam and crank lock kit, 1750TBLOCK 6899 - Alfa Workshop- Needed.
Vacuum pump gasket, MOPAR 68315243AA- Probably could have got away without it, but did not want to gamble.
Cam cover seal, MOPAR 68122847AA (not sure I needed this, better safe than sorry)- Probably could have re-used, similar to above.
2 gallons of Mopar 10 year/150,000 50/50 coolant, MOPAR 68163849AB - I just topped off, so I only needed one gallon.
Serpentine Belt, MOPAR 68237775AA - Needed.
Air Filter, MOPAR 68251477AA - Good opportunity to do this, needed.
Quinn 3/8 Digital Torque Wrench - You need a torque wrench that measures degrees if you want to follow the manual exactly.
Metric Crowfoot set - Did not need. Was going to do bolt tightening, but waiting until I move and have my own garage. I did this work at a friend's house.
C-channel mod to standard jack stands, jack pucks. - Needed

While I'm glad I did the work myself and it is part of the fun for me, I'm surprised at the quote 4C Alfa is providing from their dealer.

Timing Belt $75.85, Tensioner $116.00, Water Pump $200.00, Water Pump Seal $5.95, Serpentine Belt $42.20 =
$440.00 parts
$518.74 labor
= $958.74 total??

I don't see the timing idler pulley in that list of parts. Either way it should not add too much to the job. I'm amazed a dealer quoted ~$1000 for the job. I did not have a good feeling about my local dealer because the moment I started discussing the car they started discussing how crazy expensive it is to maintain, and how they charge $200 for an oil change. Nothing is special about changing the oil - I didn't even feel like listening to their ridiculous quote on a timing belt job. If I could have found a good dealer near me at a price of $1,000, I probably would have jumped on that to be honest since I do not have a garage of my own and had to burden a friend of mine a bit. I'd be interested to hear how 4C Alfa's experience goes; that quote seems like a good deal to me. 4C Alfa, what dealership is it?
 

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Congrats to a job well done, and great write up that should give great courage to any DIY’er that has doubts on this job.
 

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how much did your dealer quote for labor?
how much did your dealer quote for labor?
I previously said that labor was $518.75. That was for the timing belt replacement only.
I just dropped off the car at the dealer today. But because I am having the serpentine belt & water pump replaced, the labor cost is now $920.00, not $518.75. ? I thought that they had to remove the serpentine belt and water pump as part of the timing belt change, in which case the labor cost would not increase. Was I wrong or are they just taking advantage of me? I just want to get this done, so I do not have to think about it again until 5 years from now.
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
The serpentine belt must come off to do the timing belt. The water pump does not, but at most it adds 30 min to the job. I'm being very generous with that estimate too, it is only two bolts that hold it in place. The intake came pulley has be slid off for access, but it is already loose for the timing belt job. In reality it's like 10 to 15 min to do it once you have the access.
 

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I figure on having to do my timing belt at the end of 2020. Was just wondering last night if a water pump replacement is really necessary if car has less than 5,000 miles on it. I am very familiar with the "while you are in there" mentality from some of my other car repairs, but I figure the savings would not only be the cost of the pump, but also the labor to drain, refill, and bleed the cooling system. The total labor may be 1-2 hours saved by leaving pump in place. Typically water pumps last well over 50,000 miles (with some going double that).
 

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The serpentine belt must come off to do the timing belt. The water pump does not, but at most it adds 30 min to the job. I'm being very generous with that estimate too, it is only two bolts that hold it in place. The intake came pulley has be slid off for access, but it is already loose for the timing belt job. In reality it's like 10 to 15 min to do it once you have the access.
The 1st time I took it to them I asked for just the timing belt change, labor was $ 518.74. The second time I asked for timing belt, serpentine belt and the water pump. The labor is now $920.00. That is $402.00 increase for the labor. That does any not make sense to me. It sounds like they made a mistake and are charging me twice for the tear down labor.
Once to get to the timing belt and another complete tear down to get at the water pump. I will point this out to them when I pick up the car next week. They seem to be a good dealer and have treated me fairly in the past. If you have any other info that I could point out to them I would appreciate it. Thanks !
 

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Discussion Starter · #39 ·
I figure on having to do my timing belt at the end of 2020. Was just wondering last night if a water pump replacement is really necessary if car has less than 5,000 miles on it. I am very familiar with the "while you are in there" mentality from some of my other car repairs, but I figure the savings would not only be the cost of the pump, but also the labor to drain, refill, and bleed the cooling system. The total labor may be 1-2 hours saved by leaving pump in place. Typically water pumps last well over 50,000 miles (with some going double that).
I agree that the water pump should not NEED to be replaced with such low miles. I don't think you will have any issue holding off on it, but in the end it is small gamble. In the end I decided to do it since I did not have any labor expenses.
 

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I agree that the water pump should not NEED to be replaced with such low miles. I don't think you will have any issue holding off on it, but in the end it is small gamble. In the end I decided to do it since I did not have any labor expenses.
Just had the 5 year service done (9k miles) and the water pump had a small leak. I would just have it replaced for peace of mind.


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