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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Thanks to some help from Matt at Alfa9 Supply, I received the Koshi carbon fibre seatbelt trim kit as a Christmas gift from my wife.

Time and weather have finally permitted me to install it.

In all honesty, I was waiting for Docron to do it and post a DIY, as I didn't find any instructions online. :wink2:

If you are not familiar with the product, it is here:
http://shop.koshigroup.com/product/carbon-fiber-alfa-romeo-4c-safety-belt-system-covering/

This is what the parts look like:


There are installed pictures on the link, above.

As with all Koshi products, the fit and look are superb. The weave is smaller than that of the tub (as seen in the photos on their site), but that just makes these pop a bit. Looks great!

Anyway, on to installing.
Difficulty level is a 2/5, meaning you must not be a moron to attempt this.

What you'll need:


Flashlight
Spray lube (optional)
# 3 and # 4 metric allen wrench bits
Socket drive with bit holder
Extension for socket drive.
Screwdriver with bit holder (long, or which can use the socket extension).
Small (thin) screwdrivers (I used a Phillips and a flat).
Large flat screwdriver.
Sharp knife.
Snub-nose ("linesman") pliers.
Container for screws.

The fine print:
Neither I, nor the forum, are responsible in any way for any work you may do to your car, or any injury or damage caused during the work or as a consequence thereof. You have to take part of the seatbelt assembly apart to do this. If you fail to disassemble or put it back together correctly and it fails, you or your passenger could be injured or killed.

Steps:
1. Find a parking spot where you can open both doors full width.

2. Open both doors. Do it now because of Step 3.

3. Disconnect battery. This is optional, but because you will be working around the seatbelt pretensioner, part of the passive restraint system, I think it is a good idea.

4. Now you can close one door (and the window will stay down). Keep one open wide.

5. Side the seat all the way forward and tilt it full forward. It stays there for the entire process.

6. Remove the 4 bolts holding the plastic seatbelt trim to the rear of the tub with a #3 metric allen key bit in a screwdriver. This is dead simple, except pay heed to those who have warned that if something falls under the seat, you will never retrieve it.

7. The stock trim is slit at the top (behind the belt), so you just thread the belt out that way, put the Koshi piece on and re-install the bolts. Really easy. Hardest part (which is not hard) it to make sure you have the correct side piece in your hand, as they are different.

8. Un-screw and remove the 7 bolts holding the bottom plastic trim cover, using the # 4 allen head socket. Two of the three of the bottom ones on each side on my car were corroded a bit, but all came out OK. You'll have to switch back and forth from socket to screwdriver to extension to get at them all.

9. Loop the seatbelt over the headrest of the seat, to keep it out of the way and prevent twisting.

10. Locate the plastic anchor assembly above this trim, where the seatbelt loops through (and the anchor cable exits at the bottom). You have to disconnect the anchor cable, to be able to thread the cable out of the plastic trim piece and into the new one. That's the trick of this install.

11. With a sharp knife, slit the soft wrap on this anchor connector where its plastic cover pieces meet.
Do so on both sides (even though one side is the start and end of the wrap, there may be some gum that still holds the plastic pieces together.

12. Rotate the seatbelt loop in the head of this piece, to expose a rectangular button that releases the top of the plastic cover. Using a large bit flat screwdriver, press in on this button, and pop the top away from the rest of the cover. Work around the sides of the piece to release the cover on both sides. This is harder than it should be

13. The bottom of the cover is held in place by a small ledge, and two pins that I still don't fully understand. Pulling the cover up toward the belt loop releases the ledge, and some ignorance and tenacity eventually released the pins as well (wiggling them with a small screwdriver helped). There is a rectangular hole in the bottom near where the cable exits, which might have something to do with this but I haven't discovered what. Or, maybe it is a place to insert a tool that would avoid having to take the piece apart. I don't know.



On the image above, you will see a pivot, a white plastic cam, and a black steel bar. They are important.

14. At the bottom of the anchor assembly, near the aft edge, there is an odd shaped hole. Insert a thin screwdriver (I used a Phillips as my flat head didn't go far enough in). It has to engage to the outer edge of the white plastic cam, rotating it out of the way of the steel bar. You can see in the window (where the cam is visible in the photo, next to the pivot and bar) when it is fully retracted.

You can see the shiny screwdriver shaft at the top part of this photo:


15. Now, grow an extra pair of hands, because it will help!
- hold the assembly firmly in one hand, and with your fingers, keep upward pressure on the screwdriver locking the cam.
- push down on the assembly against the cable at the bottom, to create slack in the lock.
- Using the snub-nose pliers, rotate the bar toward the pivot - about 15 degrees to the opposite side of the window from where you found it. Hold it there.
- pull up on the assembly and it should release from the cable. There is a steel barb at the top of the cable, which locks into the steel bar, held in place by the white plastic cam.


Here's the part after release, with the bar out of the way:


16. Keep the screwdriver holding the cam open, in place (doesn't matter if it slips closed for now). I think it helps in the re-assembly later.

17. Now, you can thread the plastic bottom trim piece out over the cable.

18. Remove the grommet from the stock piece, and put it on the Koshi part. Again, be sure you have the correct side trim piece before you reassemble.

19. Thread the cable back through the grommet on the new piece.

20. It is a bit easier to bolt the new piece into the tub before putting the seat belt back onto the anchor cable. Use some spray lube on the bottom bolts to discourage corrosion. Don't tighten any until they are all hand started. Careful not to cross thread any.

21. Re-assembly of the seatbelt anchor is a snap - literally. You push the barb end of the cable back through the hole (having the belt slipped over the headrest helps it not to have twisted, but be sure there are no twists before you do this). The barb faces aft, toward the pivot. Remove the screwdriver holding the cam open. The anchor cable just locks in. Tug it to be sure. Check that the steel bar is back in the locked position, and that the cam is holding it there.

22. Re-assemble the trim cover on the anchor assembly from bottom to top.

23. Repeat on the other seatbelt.

Time: 40 minutes. If you have a friend do it for you, then this is a ONE BEER job. Not more!

Enjoy!
 

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Lacks finished job pictures, unacceptable :)

How can we be sure you didn't end with, at least, 5 screws sparing? xD
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Feel free to add or correct anything, if you've also done this!
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Lacks finished job pictures, unacceptable :)

How can we be sure you didn't end with, at least, 5 screws sparing? xD
No spare screws (they are all too obvious), but some blood. It isn't auto mechanics without blood!
:laugh:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Installed photos from the Koshi website, because my camera battery literally packed it in with the last installation shot:







 

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Very timely....i walked Alan (bunta garage) through this very same process with pictures on Friday..... :)

I was eventually planning on doing a DIY on it but Kevin beat me to it. Great job.
Although my pictures are better.... ;) j/k

What's ironic is that the Service Manual illustrates a seemingly simple retention clip on the seatbelt anchor for removal....phooey. Lol.
 
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Very timely....i walked Alan (bunta garage) through this very same process with pictures on Friday..... :)

I was eventually planning on doing a DIY on it but Kevin beat me to it. Great job.
Although my pictures are better.... ;) j/k

What's ironic is that the Service Manual illustrates a seemingly simple retention clip on the seatbelt anchor for removal....phooey. Lol.
Hey Doc. Good to hear from you (even if your DIY would come too late now :p ).
Feel free to add your pix here.

I suspect that there is a tool that goes in where I stuck my screwdriver to unlock the cam (probably with a plastic lock on it to keep the pressure on) and another to slide into that square slot beside where the cable exits (to rotate the bar) instead of taking the anchor trim apart. But I don't have such a tool set, nor would I have guessed at its existance until I took at least one side apart.
 

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13. The bottom of the cover is held in place by a small ledge, and two pins that I still don't fully understand. Pulling the cover up toward the belt loop releases the ledge, and some ignorance and tenacity eventually released the pins as well (wiggling them with a small screwdriver helped). There is a rectangular hole in the bottom near where the cable exits, which might have something to do with this but I haven't discovered what. Or, maybe it is a place to insert a tool that would avoid having to take the piece apart. I don't know.
Everything was smooth sailing until step #13. I was dreading step 13 because of the "two pins that I still don't fully understand..." part. As best I can figure the two plastic trim pieces which hold the cam and lever assembly inside of them actually each have a rectangular plastic component on their bottom ends. These fit over each other when the piece is fully assembled to create a tunnel. The locking cable goes through the tunnel they create and is then locked into the cam and lever arm assembly. In other words, the two trim pieces can not be separated with the cable attached because the cable passes through a closed opening on both of them (unless one of the rectangular pieces is broken). I think what 4Canada's picture of the two pins shows is the what is left of rectangular plastic component on one trim piece once the thin plastic back side which forms the rectangle has broken off of it.

I was able to disconnet the cable while the two trim pieces were attached to each other. With some gentle manipulation, the two pieces can be separated enough to see the side of the white plastic cam and the lever arm. The cam can be pushed into open position from the side using a screwdriver, pliers or the like. With cam open, it is possible to reach in between the two partially opened trim pieces with a thin pair of pliers and turn the lever arm so it releases the cable. With a little back and forth motion on the cable, it will release and you can separate the cable from the trim pieces and locking mechanism.

Once the cable was released, I was able to let go of the cam and lever arm and everything remained locked in proper position for reassembly.

One can put the two trim pieces back together, install the Koshi piece and then put the barb back through the bottom opening in the assembly and it will lock back into place once you push it in the correct orientation (barb portion toward lever arm and cam).

First side was a pain in the ass but once I had some experience with it and realized that the two trim pieces did not need to be fully separated from one another, the second side went much smoother.
 

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Photos show extent of separation of the two trim pieces that I needed to access cam and lever arm, free cable with barb end released from assembly and bottom of the trim piece. The larger rectangle is the bottom of the trim piece is where the cable is reinserted to lock the barb back in place. I think the smaller opening might be to put a screwdriver in to release the cam and the third middle size opening might allow a tool to be put in to turn the lever arm (which would allow for dissasembly without messing with the outer trip pieces at all) but now that I have it all together I'm not about to test this theory.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Looks great, Friscorays!

I separated the trim pieces more than that (folded one half right over), but same sort of idea. Once you get one, the second it easy. I'm sure that the other holes are intended for simpler disassembly, but not having the knowledge or the tools, separating the trim was the best option. I still don't know exactly what holds the plastic halves together, but it sure is tenacious! :wink2:

Did/are you going with the upper "triangle" mount cover too? I'm toying with that.
 

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I need to look into the triangles. Next up is the center console, waiting for one more piece to come in....

I don't think there is any way to separate the two trim pieces while the cable is attached, at least without breaking something. I did not take a picture of the two pieces on the side I did first but here is a generic diagram of the bottom of the two trim pieces looking up. The open plastic rectangles on the bottom of each trim piece overlap when it is assembled and the cable passes through the tunnel that is created when they are mated together, effectively locking them together.
 

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So in the photo of the two trim pieces clamshelled that 4Canada posted, the two posts would in original state have a thin bar of plastic running across them to enclose a rectangular space.
 

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Very timely....i walked Alan (bunta garage) through this very same process with pictures on Friday..... :)

I was eventually planning on doing a DIY on it but Kevin beat me to it. Great job.
Although my pictures are better.... ;) j/k

What's ironic is that the Service Manual illustrates a seemingly simple retention clip on the seatbelt anchor for removal....phooey. Lol.


Which page of which manual?


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk Pro
 

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Also there gotta be a better way to get the cable out

I'm done but if I had it to do over again, I think it is likely doable without any dissasembly at all.


I would try putting a screwdriver up through the small hole in the bottom of the seatbelt trim piece to see if the cam releases. Assuming that works, I would try placing another screwdriver in the second larger opening to push the lever arm over and then jiggle the cable until it releases.
 

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I'm done but if I had it to do over again, I think it is likely doable without any dissasembly at all.

I would try putting a screwdriver up through the small hole in the bottom of the seatbelt trim piece to see if the cam releases. Assuming that works, I would try placing another screwdriver in the second larger opening to push the lever arm over and then jiggle the cable until it releases.

you have to disassemble the rod from the anchor to install the lower cover. there is no way of slipping the lower cover down onto the floor....unless I am misunderstanding what you said. :)


I think you have to disassemble the clamshell as well as I don't think you can get to the second lever (as indicated by my red arrow) to release rod even if you stick a screwdriver up in the slot to disengage the first lever. :)



 

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sorry, those pictures are too small....lol



 

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Screenshots state "The image has been introduced for explanation purposes only, in order to make the procedure clearer. DO NOT SEPARATE THE SHELL FROM THE ROD."

I believe the exploded diagrams above are to help the mechanic understand what the tools are doing.

I just went out to my car and inserted a small screwdriver into the small hole of the completely assembled trim pieces and can feel it engaging the cam (picture below). I believe that the other hole in the bottom of the assembly (also seen in picture below as well as one of attached images on prior page) is aligned such that when a tool thin and long enough is inserted into it, the tool will engage the lever arm and push it into the correct position (but I don't have or can't now find such a tool). Perhaps someone with a more extensive tool kit than I can give it a try.....

P.S. This would mean the diagram in the manual is incorrect; I guess there is a first time for everything. Alternatively, I wonder if the wrap is covering an additional hole on the side of the piece as the diagram seems to indicate (I did not remove the wrap). I was wondering why they bothered with the wrap: perhaps it is there to stop tinkerers from tinkering.
 

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