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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi there, im going to get Ownership of my 4c next week. It’s going to be a 6hrs trip Back home. I will probably change the seat adjust before starting... so from the forum I did learn I will needs a set of Torx. Does any body know the correct torque setting for the seat rail to floor and the rail to seat? Thanks
 

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Congratulations!

It doesn't sound like something you want to do in a parking lot and even if seller lets you use their garage you may not want to spend the time on that. If you think it will become a bother, take something to put under your thighs - a blanket or a small pillow. I am 6' 3'' and I haven't bothered changing the seat from the lowest position to the slanted one people recommend yet - and I haven't used a pillow or anything. I think the slanted position would be better but it didn't bother me enough yet to fix that. What I fixed was the steering column height to be able to see (almost) the top of the instrument cluster but that you also don't want to do before the long drive home.
 

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I don’t know the spec, but have read of someone who took their bolts out without tools as the bolts weren’t even finger tight. I adjusted mine, and going with maximum tilt is pretty tough to get the seat reinstalled as there is not much space for the bolts with that position. I would guess I did something like 20-30 foot pounds on the bolts. Just good and tight. One Ugga dugga or so.
 

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I would also suggest to not adjust the seat until you get home. I am 6'1 and drove the car home three hours after buying from someone significantly shorter than that -- it was fine. When I did adjust the seats (lowest setting in the back; highest in the front) I remember it being tough to insert the last bolt into the seat by myself (I did not disconnect the wire connector that goes to the seat and kept the seat in the car). After I managed to do it and started bolting the seat to the floor, I found out that I needed to retap the front two holes to screw the seat in properly. I was able to kind of install the seat, and since I had an appointment at the dealer for an inspection the next day I asked them to do the retapping. In the end I am glad I did the seat adjustment, but I also don't feel it made a huge difference for me. So in my opinion there are enough things that can go wrong and the benefits are not overwhelming to do it before the trip home.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guy for your suggestion! Will probably wait but the question still up! Does anyone know the correct torque requirement for these bolt? :geek:
 

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Thanks guy for your suggestion! Will probably wait but the question still up! Does anyone know the correct torque requirement for these bolt? :geek:
I believe I have finally found this and thought I would share.

taken from the 4c manual:
Remove the seat (see Op. 7045A10 of the Service Manual).
On both sides, undo the fixing screws (1– Fig. 19).
Lift or lower the seat and tighten the screws in the hole corresponding to the required height; the three holes determine the three preset positions for the seat height
adjustment.

and here is (see Op. 7045A10 of the Service Manual):

So its 3,6 ÷ 4,4 daNm which I believe means between 36 to 44 ft lbs.
 

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The seat to seat frame torque is 3.6 to 4.4Nm (32-39 in-lbs). I recommend you use blue Loktite.

The seat frame to tub torque is 32-39Nm (24-28 ft-lbs). Be very careful to not cross-thread these bolts as the threads were bonded into the tub at the factory. Take your time. I recommend that you have an M10x1.25 bottoming tap, compressed air and a bit of oil available to get the threads squeaky-clean.
 

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Can I ask where you got this from? Not that I don't belive you but I have to find a lot more specs as I'm doing all the work on my 4c. The service manual i bought is missing a lot of this info.
 

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I bought a factory service manual CD from MOPAR Tech Authority several years ago. Not sure they are still available though.

The tidbits like blue Loktite and being careful about cross-threading come from personal experience.
 

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Thanks, surprisingly low torque for a M8, I’d most likely severely over torque if you had not shared. Seems like this is with light lubrication?
These are the bolts that you want to use Loktite on. The Loktite will act as a lubricant.
 

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I use the Loctite purple (low strength) for just about everything. It works for keeping stuff from vibrating loose, but does not harden up like the blue. If you put too much blue on something I have found it extremely difficult to remove the bolts.
 

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Has anyone done a video of taking the seat out, but not all the way out (leaving seat belt connecter), adjusting the seat and reinstalling? I just took a screenshot of the torque specs. Thank you for posting them. I just wanted to see how folks have angled the seat to work on it without disconnecting it. - Stan, 2015 Spider, Maryland, USA
 

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Has anyone done a video of taking the seat out, but not all the way out (leaving seat belt connecter), adjusting the seat and reinstalling? I just took a screenshot of the torque specs. Thank you for posting them. I just wanted to see how folks have angled the seat to work on it without disconnecting it. - Stan, 2015 Spider, Maryland, USA
Hi Stan,
Not sure about the video (maybe someone recalls one), but having done this a few years ago, I can advise that you need to push the seat over (sideways) in each direction to do the appropriate side.
I think it required the seat back to be tilted upright or forward in order to make room.
Keep the seat pointing forward, but push the seat backrest toward the passenger side to reveal / do the outboard rail (lots of heavy towels or cardboard to protect the carbon fibre sill), and then lean it over with the back out the door to get to the inboard side bolts.

Hope that makes sense. I don't think that I have my photos from this procedure anymore.
 

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Has anyone done a video of taking the seat out, but not all the way out (leaving seat belt connecter), adjusting the seat and reinstalling? I just took a screenshot of the torque specs. Thank you for posting them. I just wanted to see how folks have angled the seat to work on it without disconnecting it. - Stan, 2015 Spider, Maryland, USA
If you cut a torx bit, you are able to get it in between center console and seat, to loosen/tighten the screws. Not sure you have room to get the screw out though....
115743

115745
 

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Hi Stan,
Not sure about the video (maybe someone recalls one), but having done this a few years ago, I can advise that you need to push the seat over (sideways) in each direction to do the appropriate side.
I think it required the seat back to be tilted upright or forward in order to make room.
Keep the seat pointing forward, but push the seat backrest toward the passenger side to reveal / do the outboard rail (lots of heavy towels or cardboard to protect the carbon fibre sill), and then lean it over with the back out the door to get to the inboard side bolts.

Hope that makes sense. I don't think that I have my photos from this procedure anymore.
Thanks for the advice. I will give it a try with a friend. I will be lowering the passenger seat. With the torque specs for the tub screws and your advice I am more confident to try. Thanks.
 

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With all that hassle, just take the seat out and work on it on a bench. It is so much easier than trying to manipulate the seat and not scratch the tub.
 

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I would think that it would be easier to take the seat out completely however I have been told it is difficult to detach the seat belt sensor. Is the seat belt sensor easily removed?
 

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That is correct, the seat belt sensor connecter is difficult to detach. But it can be done. I don't remember how I did it though, but I did!
 

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The seat to seat frame torque is 3.6 to 4.4Nm (32-39 in-lbs). I recommend you use blue Loktite.

The seat frame to tub torque is 32-39Nm (24-28 ft-lbs). Be very careful to not cross-thread these bolts as the threads were bonded into the tub at the factory. Take your time. I recommend that you have an M10x1.25 bottoming tap, compressed air and a bit of oil available to get the threads squeaky-clean.
Thanks for the conversion and input on the thread nature, also add that a bit of stronger loctite for these and lower end of torquing will make for a good time.
 
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