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There already are a couple of threads dedicated to discussing the bolt tightening service, but they've become very difficult to navigate due to a lot of side digressions taking place. Therefore I hope the moderators will be gracious enough to allow for a thread to run where we exclusively indicate actual quotes provided by dealers for the tightening service, with or without the name of the dealer, and with only any necessary information (such as, does it include oil change or not, is a loaner included etc.).

Any discussion about whether it's a one year or two year or mileage based, if you can do it yourself or not, if it invalidates the warranty or not, etc., please leave it to one of the other existing threads. While very interesting, it makes a mess of trying to find good price references.
 

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I have asked four dealers. Awaiting on two more who didn't pick up the phone today on several occasions. All prices are "plus taxes". I will leave the dealers' names anonymous.

Region: US Northeast.

Dealer A1 and A2 (same company, two locations): $1,406 (10% off if done before Feb 28).

Dealer B: $1,525

Dealer C: $995, inclusive of oil change.
 

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My 4C is 12 months old. 3600 miles. Bought brand new. It's due for it's 1st service. I was quoted around $1600 plus tax for the bolt tightening and oil change. I'm taking it in next month.
 

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I have asked four dealers. Awaiting on two more who didn't pick up the phone today on several occasions. All prices are "plus taxes". I will leave the dealers' names anonymous.

Region: US Northeast.

Dealer A1 and A2 (same company, two locations): $1,406 (10% off if done before Feb 28).

Dealer B: $1,525

Dealer C: $995, inclusive of oil change.


Why would labor include tax?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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I just had two quotes this week. Prices in Canadian dollars.
First one was $1500 including oil change.
Second one was $1144 not including oil change. Oil change quoted at $312.
So pretty even.
Today exchange was 1 cdn dollar to 0.75 usd.
Tax included
 

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Discussion Starter #6
I have asked four dealers. Awaiting on two more who didn't pick up the phone today on several occasions. All prices are "plus taxes". I will leave the dealers' names anonymous.

Region: US Northeast.

Dealer A1 and A2 (same company, two locations): $1,406 (10% off if done before Feb 28).

Dealer B: $1,525

Dealer C: $995, inclusive of oil change.
Update (apologies I can't edit the original post):

Dealer D: "About a thousand dollars", inclusive of oil change

Dealer E: "Not sure, we haven't done one yet"

Dealer F is still not picking up the phone for the second day.
 

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Rick R, in summary from prior posts i believe bolt tightening ran from $800 to $1,400 depending where your dealership is located as some areas have a higher cost of living Also, it seemed if you went a Fiat/Alfa dealer it tended to be on the lower side compared to a Maserati/Alfa dealer. My Fiat/Alfa dealer charged me in the ball park of $850 and provided me a copy of the bolt tightening summary
 

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I have asked four dealers. Awaiting on two more who didn't pick up the phone today on several occasions. All prices are "plus taxes". I will leave the dealers' names anonymous.

Region: US Northeast.

Dealer A1 and A2 (same company, two locations): $1,406 (10% off if done before Feb 28).

Dealer B: $1,525

Dealer C: $995, inclusive of oil change.


Is dealer a1 and a2 in Millbury and Weston?
 

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Rick R, in summary from prior posts i believe bolt tightening ran from $800 to $1,400 depending where your dealership is located as some areas have a higher cost of living Also, it seemed if you went a Fiat/Alfa dealer it tended to be on the lower side compared to a Maserati/Alfa dealer. My Fiat/Alfa dealer charged me in the ball park of $850 and provided me a copy of the bolt tightening summary

Hey Veloce2,
WHat exactly did the "bolt tightening summary" consist of?
 

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This is the 5 page bolt tightening summary that the tech provided me showing before and after specs
 

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sorry i can only load one of five pages. i'll see if i can find a work around. as you can see though it list the component and associated bolts that need tightening along with before and after specs
 

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sorry i can only load one of five pages. i'll see if i can find a work around. as you can see though it list the component and associated bolts that need tightening along with before and after specs
Interesting that they recorded these - that's the first such instance that I recall hearing about.

The official Alfa Romeo bolt tightening procedure, including specs and locations of all the fasteners, can be found on the 4C cloud.
Index with links is in a sticky thread in the "Engine and Technical" section of this forum.
 

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from what the tech told me this is the procedure that must be filled out by all techs when doing the bolt tightening.
 

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from what the tech told me this is the procedure that must be filled out by all techs when doing the bolt tightening.
We'll all have to watch for that in future.

I believe that this is similar to what Lexus did/does with the LFA - my understanding is that the before/after torques are entered into a form which is accessible by their dealers and the manufacturer.
 

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What is the technique for measuring a "before" torque?

Overcoming static torque takes greater torque than the actual tightening torque.

Conversely, a lug tightened to, for example, 100 ft lbs will take less than 100 ft lbs to loosen it. Unless the lug has been in place for a long time, in which case it may take more than 100 ft lbs to overcome the static torque. In both cases, the tightening torque is still 100 ft lbs.

My hypothesis is that the before and after torque numbers on Tom's chart are not comparable. In other words, if you test the freshly tightened 55 ft lb bolt, the new "before" number will not be 55 ft lb.
 

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i'm not an expert in this but what i learned from the tech is that the bolts are first loosened then retorqued to the correct spec. To me, that means the loosening spec is not that important and/or an exact science but the important outcome is to get the final torqued bolts to manufacturer spec.
 

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What is the technique for measuring a "before" torque?

Overcoming static torque takes greater torque than the actual tightening torque.

Conversely, a lug tightened to, for example, 100 ft lbs will take less than 100 ft lbs to loosen it. Unless the lug has been in place for a long time, in which case it may take more than 100 ft lbs to overcome the static torque. In both cases, the tightening torque is still 100 ft lbs.

My hypothesis is that the before and after torque numbers on Tom's chart are not comparable. In other words, if you test the freshly tightened 55 ft lb bolt, the new "before" number will not be 55 ft lb.
i'm not an expert in this but what i learned from the tech is that the bolts are first loosened then retorqued to the correct spec. To me, that means the loosening spec is not that important and/or an exact science but the important outcome is to get the final torqued bolts to manufacturer spec.
I think you are both correct.

Definitely, run down torque is less than static torque. And it is the "after" value that matters.
Which makes the question of how (and why) the "initial" torque measurements are recorded a good one.
 

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I think you are both correct.

Definitely, run down torque is less than static torque. And it is the "after" value that matters.
Which makes the question of how (and why) the "initial" torque measurements are recorded a good one.
the initial torque reading can be helpful if most 55 ft-lb bolt take lets say 45 ft-lbs to loosen but if you run across some 30 ft-lbs or other significantly lower specs then its safe to say that there is a problem. it's all relative.
 

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the initial torque reading can be helpful if most 55 ft-lb bolt take lets say 45 ft-lbs to loosen but if you run across some 30 ft-lbs or other significantly lower specs then its safe to say that there is a problem. it's all relative.
Yes, but I think that Xcentric's point is that if it takes an initial 45 ft-lbs to loosen the bolt, then it was actually torqued to less than 45, which might indeed be a bad thing.

And here we are, already digressing on this new "skinny" thread. I was wondering how long it would take to go off topic. Sorry. But it is a valid point and that schedule is interesting information. Keen to see how many of us will also get one this time. I've got that service coming up on at least one car in 2019!
 

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Rather than getting wrapped around the axle on 'bolt tightening' has anybody approached the service centre with the direct question - "Car is Xyr old and on Ymiles, I want the service that's needed. How much?"


Some owners buy cars and don't know the full extent of what a main dealer undertakes during a service. A view I take knowing that what the main dealer does/doesn't do will not affect warranty given they are doing it. I take it in, they tell me what's needed, I pay, the book is stamped and I drive off. Job done. First year service, 750 miles covered, AR main dealer, £400


Some dealers are mis-interpreting the schedule if reading the book as it's written. 'Vehicle fastening checks' are by miles travalled not time, is what it says. Howeverg getting a sensible answer from AR Customer Services is not helpful when they transfer you on the phone from UK to Italy.
 
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